Augmented Reality Use Cases (That’s Not Games)

Image Source: Gov Loop

Augment Reality (AR) has received a lot of attention with the success of Pokemon Go. AR aims to extract animations and place them into real-world environments. It has essentially merged the gap between reality and computer generated simulations by manipulating what the user experiences via sight, sound, smell and touch. In brief, AR integrates animations into your reality so the general setting looks the same but with some few added details. Although AR is related to Virtual Reality (VR), the two technologies are not synonymous. VR produces computer generated simulations of an environment that users can experience by wearing a helmet or gloves with built-in sensors. Read my previous blog on VR for more insight. AR on the other hand allows users to experience the technology simply by glancing into the screen of an Android, iPhone or other mobile device such as a tablet. AR is altering the world as we know it or at least changing the way people experience the world. The Pokémon explosion is probably the most well-known platform that has utilized AR for gaming. It may sound silly to some, but the game is highly addictive. To understand specific reasons behind this obsession, read my previous blog to learn why Pokémon Go has become so successful. To gain a better understanding of how app developers have taken advantage of this innovative technology, we will look at a few providers who have successfully used AR for non-gaming purposes.

Health and Education with AR: Anatomy 4D

This app is a cloud-based, interactive examining simulation resource for academic uses. It offers users with online access to anatomy data while analyzing detailed bone structures and organ systems. This can be done by downloading specialized research templates or by enabling structure projection and layer blending. Anatomy 4D allows project structures to synch with skin to analyze coordination and position. Users can also adequately balance the layers to reveal discrete anatomic implications. You can also hover over objects or images to reveal detailed information via label view. It is these perspectives that produce enhanced learning retention by granting students an in-depth look at any part of the body they are studying. This also is useful for medical instructors who can organize image and structure curriculums along with managing lessons and tests.

Image Source: mzstatic

Shopping with AR: Pair

This app enables users to place animated images of furniture into their space so they can perfectly visualize how it would look in real life.  Pair’s tag line is “The New Way to Try Before you Buy with Augmented Reality.” Indeed the app grants prospects an easier method to experience the end result of their interior design project. For example, let’s say you just purchased your first home and the space is completely empty. You would be able to walk room to room while viewing how you would want it to look through your mobile device. You’d be able to put furniture, pictures and other items in designated areas of the space, swap them out, switch them around etc. Cool right? Still, Pair has a much more expansive purpose than simply furniture and can enhance scientific, educational and commercial projects by giving spectators a 3D demonstration of what a particular vision would look like. I was able to see Pair in action during 500 Startups Batch 18 Demo Day and it’s pretty impressive.

Graphic Source: Google Plus

Mechanics and Construction with AR: AMA XpertEye

This month, AMA XpertEye will supply workers of the Keolis Commuter Services (KCS) in Massachusetts with AR smart glasses to improve communication and boost efficiency on their railway transportation system. These specialized glasses stream the video being recorded tethered to a mobile device. The remote supervisor monitors the recording over a laptop. From there, both parties can “exchange written messages and take screenshots of the video, annotate the images, and send them to each other.” Ultimately, their goal is to speed up delays caused from train repairs and other technical difficulties that may get them off track. Additionally, Keolis is considering the technology for training purposes so newcomers can literally see through the eyes of their seasoned field workers.

ama

Image Source: AMA XpertEye

Sports and Play with AR: RideOn Vision

This cutting edge technology created by Heads up Display is seen with their RideOn Ski Goggles. These one of a kind specs allow users to access heightened assistance while skiing or snowboarding the slopes. Map navigation systems can guide users easily through the rough and diverse terrain better than ever before. You can also communicate with other riders, see their whereabouts and even text them hands-free. In addition, the goggles allow riders to capture their surroundings and share them online for others to see. The company is also developing games that can be played directly through these exclusive lenses. And of course, users can jam to their own personalized soundtrack as they ride, jump, flip and recover from a wipe out.  Although the technology is geared for the snow, it’s useful for motorcyclists, ATV riders and other similar vehicles.

4ed21e0dc4108fa188611505d8cb28b5

Image Source: Pintrest

As technology progresses, it will be interesting to see what other AR use cases are developed.

By Rich Foreman, CEO / Apptology and Director of Startup Grind Sacramento. Rich co-authored the book Tap into the Mobile Economy and his blog has been listed in the Top 20 Mobile Marketing Blogs of 2014.  Follow Rich on Twitter at@ApptologyCEO or attend a Startup Grind Sacramento Event.

Google Cardboard: The Best Mobile Apps of 2016

Google Cardboard

What’s Google Cardboard?

If you haven’t had a chance to check out the Google Cardboard, it’s worth taking a look. For those who don’t know, Google Cardboard is a virtual reality platform that utilizes a cardboard head mount where you can  attach your smartphone.  It was designed to be a low cost virtual reality system with headsets that cost as little as $1.99.  In comparison, an Oculus Rift head set will cost around $1,000.  Moreover, developers can create their own applications using the Cardboard SDK.

Virtual Reality: You Have to See it to Understand

In his TEDx Talk, Chris Milk stated “Talking about virtual reality is like dancing about architecture.”  You have to see it to understand it.  To give it a try, you’ll need to purchase a cardboard headset.  Official Google Cardboard viewers can be purchased here.  They range from $15 to $120. On Amazon, you can find it as low a $1.99. If you’re lucky,  I’ve seen them given away as SWAG at startup conferences.

google-cardboard-wearable-virtual-reality-headset-640x0

Image Source: Digital Trends 

When you peep through its lenses, you experience a world generated via mobile app with the ability of displaying landscapes, film, video games and other multimedia formats. The Google Play Store offers a plethora of apps to choose from and is compatible with iPhone and Android devices.

After you’ve get your Google Cardboard headset, here are the best mobile apps that you can try:

iPhone Mobile Apps

unnamed

Image Source: VR Island Screenshot

Android Mobile Apps

DeepSpaceBattle_vr+cardboard+games

Image Source: Deep Space Battle Screenshot

With developers having access to the Google Cardboard SDK,  It will be interesting to see what innovative uses of Google Cardboard arises. If you still have your doubts about mobile apps, check out why the public sector needs a mobile strategy and how this could relate to the next generation of VR applications!

By Rich Foreman, CEO / Apptology and Director of Startup Grind Sacramento. Rich co-authored the book Tap into the Mobile Economy and his blog has been listed in the Top 20 Mobile Marketing Blogs of 2014.  Follow Rich on Twitter at@ApptologyCEO or attend a Startup Grind Sacramento Event.

 

4 Tips to Attract Mobile App Investors

If you’re thinking of starting a new business, you’re not alone. With so many new applications being developed in recent years, it seems that the young entrepreneurs are taking over. In fact, according to the Kauffman Foundation, new businesses (0-5 years old) make up almost 20% of all of the net job creation in the United States. The hardest part of a new business, though, is finding the funds to get it up and running. Here are some things to keep in mind when pitching to potential investors without scaring the living the daylights out of them.
scared

Mobile App Tip #1: Be original

Before an investor gets involved, he or she wants to be wowed. In short, they’re unimpressed until they’re impressed. This is clearly demonstrated by Angel Investors’ deal acceptance rate of 21%. They’re not going to shell out thousands of dollars just to produce a copycat product of something that has already been invented.
Your product needs to be fresh, it needs to be relevant, and it needs to be a sure thing. Investors are more likely to give their money to people who produce an original product than those who try to recreate the wheel.

Mobile-Apps-New-Study-Reports-Many-Presidential-Campaign-Apps-May-Leak-Personal-Data-680x350

Image Source: Technology Pep

Mobile App Tip #2: Put it all on the table

Investors value honesty above all else, since the lack of information can come back to bite them more often than not. As of 2011, the percentage of “bad exits,” or bankruptcies were as high as 24% – so you could see how they would be a little sensitive

Make sure that from day one you are as honest about the strengths and weaknesses of your product as possible, because if you aren’t, investors will sense it and back off. The people you are pitching to didn’t get to where they are by being stupid. They most likely have a keen sense for when something isn’t right, so be respectful of that.

persuasion_news

Image Source: PCMA

Mobile App Tip #3: Be flexible.

Nothing turns an investor off faster than an attitude of “my way or the highway” from an entrepreneur. An investor wants to feel involved from the very beginning, and wants to feel their entrepreneur is coachable. More deals happen in the early stages of the company’s life than any other stages for a reason: The investor wants to have had enough time to see potential, but wants to get in early enough to ensure their role in its growth. You may have birthed the idea for this company, but if you want the investor on board, you’re going to have to be flexible and let them develop it.

Mobile App Tip #4: Have the Four M’s in place.

Mark Suster, a successful entrepreneur turned venture capitalist, outlined in his article The Four Main Things That Investors Look For In A Startup that an entrepreneur should demonstrate the four golden M’s: fast, upward Momentum, a stellar Management team, a large Market, and, of course, a great deal of Money or earning potential. This should all be demonstrated very early on in the first presentation.

images-13

Image Source: MarketUmbrella

As with anything else, put yourself in the investor’s shoes and you’ll understand why and how they do the things they do. Do your research, not just on venture capitalists, but on the specific people you’re trying to meet – and you will go far. When you’re able to seal the deal, the next phase is to maintain it. You should read the 5 challenges of a startup appreneur so you can best prepare for the journey ahead.

 

Written by guest writer: Jeanine Amella