The 2016 Presidential App War: Clinton vs. Trump

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The 2016 Presidential App War:  Clinton vs. Trump

As the 2016 Presidential Campaign comes to a climax this Tuesday, as an app developer, I’m going to take a few minutes to compare the official apps from each campaign.  Because of the importance of mobile, I see that apps will be a crucial tool for political campaigns and it’s interesting to see how the major party candidates have implemented their mobile app strategy.

Hillary 2016 

Debuting last July on iOS and now available on Android, the Hillary 2016 App is about making the election fun. It has the feel of a mobile gaming platform while incorporating strategies similar to Duolingo to rapidly gain support and simplify the ways in which users can do so. Over 100,000 people have downloaded the app and completed over 800,000 built in activities. For instance, users can be quizzed on Trump’s controversial statements or share Clinton’s photos on social networks. There is also the option of earning points by, for example, registering to vote. Users are also able to get a lot more interactive and make them feel as if they play an active role in the campaign. Gamers can experience the view of her office by swiping away on the touch screen. They can even water the plants and pet the presidential dog, Winnie! Lead developer, Stephanie Cheng, said that users pet the virtual Winnie dog an average of 5 times per day. People also have the option of contributing to the campaign, signing up for future events, checking in to current ones and read related news. The Clinton administration said that the app has caused thousands of new supporters to step up and get involved.   The app has a clean and crisp look and is definitely geared towards millennials.  It uses gamification and encourages users to do political focused activities with both virtual and real awards.  The top award includes a signed post card by Hillary Clinton.

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 Trump America First 

Trump’s team responded shortly after Clinton’s app launch with their own called ‘America First.‘ It providers users with news, videos, articles, a donation processor and social networking links. The last option allows people to contact other Trump supporters in their region. There’s also a countdown with the words that explains ‘Time Left Until We Defeat Crooked Hillary.’ The more that users participate and use the app, the higher they climb the rankings. There are a total of 8 levels starting from the ‘apprentice’ and ending with the ‘Big League.’ Users can earn points as well and even compete with others based on how deliberately they show support. The app is a lot more simplistic and was designed for an older audience despite the main consumer aged 18-29.

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The main difference between the apps is the audience it targets.  The Clinton app is geared towards millennials with a big focus on gamification and it has a much crisper look.  As a Gen Xer, I found the app a bit annoying; I would be more interested in getting news and information which is a layer below the gaming aspect.  The Trump app is geared towards an older crowd with news being in the forefront which I found more useful.  With that said, I found the Trump app to be a bit cluttered and dated from a visual aspect.

One of the things that Trump app does consistently is that it sends out regular push notifications whereas in the Clinton app, I haven’t received any.  I actually do wonder if the Clinton app purposely avoids sending out push notifications in fear of the user deleting the app for being annoying.

Where the Clinton app beats the Trump app in a landslide is ASO (App Store Optimization).  When I searched for “clinton” in the Apple App store, as expected the official Clinton Campaign app appears first.  Whereas a search for “trump” the official Trump app appears 9th (after 8 Trump satire apps).

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Similarly, on Google Play, the official Clinton app comes up first and the official Trump app comes up 5th.

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Recommendations for Future Political apps

In conclusion, for future political campaigns that are thinking about developing an app, here are some of my recommendations:

  • Focus on ASO:   Don’t make your supporters have to search for your official app behind a sea of satire apps.
  • Engagement is crucial: Give a reason for the user to continually use the app.
  • Know your audience: design the your app for you’re the demographic that you’re targeting

 

By Rich Foreman, CEO / Apptology and Director of Startup Grind Sacramento. Rich co-authored the book Tap into the Mobile Economy and his blog has been listed in the Top 20 Mobile Marketing Blogs of 2014.  Follow Rich on Twitter at@ApptologyCEO or attend a Startup Grind Sacramento Event.

 

Tips for Apple App Store Marketing

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The app marketplace is highly profitable, highly competitive, and highly cluttered. Because of this, app developers absolutely need an app store marketing strategy to realize success in the app marketplace. Optimizing your application for success in the app marketplace should be a vital part of your overall app development strategy.

App Store Marketing Tips

According to a Statista worldwide mobile app revenue forecast, 41.1 Billion dollars in revenue was generated from mobile apps worldwide in 2015. This year, app revenue is on track to reach 50.9 Billion dollars. Even more astounding, 2020 is projected to see over 101.1 Billion dollars in mobile app revenue worldwide. With this continued rise in profitability, the app market will continue becoming cluttered with an influx of mobile applications. Here are some tips on developing a rock solid Apple App Store marketing strategy to ensure your app stands out:

Identify Your Advantage

Lay out your competitive advantage clearly and concisely. No one is going to read a long-winded statement about your app. They want to know exactly how the app is unique, what problem it solves, and how it improves on what’s already on the market.

Is the Price Right?

When pricing your app, find the sweet spot. You can decide between different pricing models depending on what kind of app you are looking to build. For example, some popular pricing models include flat price to download, in-app purchases, and in-app advertising. Charging to download is going to limit the amount of people who download your app since a free download is almost always more alluring to the user. In-app purchases allow the user to download the app for free and pay for upgrades within the application. The feasibility of this will vary depending on the nature of the application. In-app advertising is another popular pricing model. This model keeps the application free to the user in exchange for them viewing advertisements. Finding the right pricing model will depend on how you want users to interact with the application.

App Store Optimization

App store optimization (ASO) is very similar to its web-based counterpart strategy, SEO. ASO involves making sure that your app is showing up first for relevant keywords within the app store. Most users download an app after using the Apple App Store’s search feature. Therefore, your app will get lost in the marketplace if it isn’t showing up for related keyword phrases. A successful ASO strategy requires:

A common-sense title: According to app development company Enola Labs:

People sometimes forget just how important choosing the right title really is. For one, your app title will give you the heaviest search traffic. Second, you don’t want to have to change your title; It’s extra work, updates take time for Apple to process and most importantly it hurts any progress you’ve made in any initial marketing efforts.”

So, don’t get too creative with your app title. The title should be searchable and include the targeted keyword.

Bullet point features: Quick, important details about your application that will help the user decide if they want to download it or not.

Relevant keywords:  Because relevant keywords are so important, be sure to include specific keywords that relate to your application and its functionality.

High-Quality Screenshots: These help the user “experience” the application before deciding to download.

Your Marketing Strategy Will Evolve

Most of all, it is important to note that the app store is still very young and will continue to evolve. Therefore, your app store marketing strategy needs to continue to evolve right alongside it.

By Rich Foreman, CEO / Apptology and Director of Startup Grind Sacramento. Rich co-authored the book Tap into the Mobile Economy and his blog has been listed in the Top 20 Mobile Marketing Blogs of 2014.  Follow Rich on Twitter at@ApptologyCEO or attend a Startup Grind Sacramento Event.

Equity Crowdfunding: A New Funding Source for Startups

Spend a little time in the startup world and you’ll quickly become familiar with crowdfunding, from consumer platforms like Kickstarter or Indigogo to the new equity crowdfunding models. Launching a crowdfunding campaign is becoming a great way for startups to gain exposure while generating financial support for their project – and in the same time, validating it.

So how does it work? Supporters that contribute funds for a startup’s cause, known as “backers,” generally receive an item in return, whether a token of the startup’s appreciation or an early version of the product.

For a famous example, consider the Oculus Rift. In 2012, Oculus Rift ran a KickStarter campaignthat raised $2.4 million. Contributors received everything from T-shirts to a prototype kit. Just four years later, Oculus Rift was acquired by Facebook for $2 billion. If this was an equity situation, investors would have received a 145x return. And that’s where equity crowdfunding comes in

Image Source: Edison Awards 

Over 3 years ago now, the U.S. Security and Exchange Commission (SEC) compiled the JOBS Act laying the foundation for investment opportunities in the 21st century. Title III of this bill had language geared towards equity crowdfunding but lacked clarity until earlier in July. Of course hundreds of pages of legal jargon isn’t something me and you would enjoy “clarifying” per se, so let’s overview some of the most exciting provisions of this bill.

Startups Can Raise $1 Million Max Per Year; But There’s a Catch

“Only $1 million?! Really?!” If you were one of the individuals hoping that the SEC would increase the maximum higher than $1 mill, Title III does not allow such terms. However, Title IV (Regulation A+) of the JOBS Act mentions that startups have the opportunity to raise up to $50 million by holding a mini Initial Public Offering (IPO) for their campaign.

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Accredited Investor? I Think Not!

Over the past couple of years, there has been debate over who can partake in equity crowdfunding. At first, if you weren’t an accredited investor, you were not eligible to contribute towards an equity crowdfunding campaign. In order to fall into this category, you had to make at least $200,000 per year and have a working networth of a minimum of $1 million. This requirement greatly limited investor access considering less than 3% of American citizens are presently considered accredited. The JOBS Act eliminates this criteria so now anyone can contribute regardless of their annual income. However, there are still limits to how much a backer can contribute.

Crowd Limitations

The SEC actually tightened the limits allowed for contributors to invest. According to the codes, investors are limited to, “(a) the greater of $2,000 or 5 percent of the lesser of their annual income or net worth, if either the annual income or the net worth of the investor is less than $100,000 and (b) 10 percent of the lesser of their annual income or net worth, if both the annual income and net worth of the investor is equal to or more than $100,000.” In other words, the ceiling stops at $100k for individual investment.

Equity Crowdfunding is Affordable for Startups

One of the biggest concerns was a past proposal requiring startups to conduct a full financial audit before launching a campaign. Of course this would cost tens of thousands of dollars that could be better channeled towards more important business expenses. Fortunately, the SEC agreed that this proposed requirement was a little excessive and not realistic for many emerging startups. They rejected this provision and replaced it with much more reasonable provisions. If a startup using equity crowdfunding wants to raise more than $100,000, financial review records are required. In addition, if a company’s end goal is less than $100,000 they have even fewer financial requirements.

Startup Responsibilities

With great opportunity comes great responsibility so please don’t cut corners on what’s required with equity crowdfunding. Startups have to disclose all of the campaign’s information from start to finish. This includes security values, the target amount, target deadline, and other important variables. The SEC needs to stay in the loop at all times so there will be a lot of logistics, business descriptions, employee profiles and other assignments that entrepreneurs will have to complete. Most importantly, equity crowdfunding is the sale of securities and these laws vary by region. You want to assure that you have crossed your T’s and dotted your I’s on all of the state and federal requirements for the sale of securities. If not, it is possible to be charged for violating a required financial mandate. And believe me, that’s no fun. Your best bet is to educate yourself and your team on what’s required on a state and federal level to avoid any complications.

The JOBs act has become law as of May 2016.   I expect to see a surge of crowd funding platforms to emerge in the near future. Indiegogo has announced that they will develop an equity crowdfunding service.  The Startup Hour is planning a Shark Tank like television show that will allow the audience to vote on featured startups with their dollars and receive equity in return.  For startups, equity crowdfunding will be another great resource to raise funds.

By Rich Foreman, CEO / Apptology and Director of Startup Grind Sacramento. Rich co-authored the book Tap into the Mobile Economy and his blog has been listed in the Top 20 Mobile Marketing Blogs of 2014.  Follow Rich on Twitter at@ApptologyCEO or attend a Startup Grind Sacramento Event.

Four Reasons Behind Pokémon Go’s Success

Pokemon Go

Four Reasons Behind Pokémon Go’s Success

I can’t seem to get away from it.  I’m watching a gaggle of millennials roam the mall with their smartphones out trying to catch the Pokémon virtual characters.  Pokémon Go has generated a lot of media buzz.  In its debut week, Pokémon Go broke the Apple App Store’s download record and it currently, holds the position of “Top Grossing iPhone” app (not bad for a free app).   So what’s made Pokémon Go so successful?  Here are my observations.

Pokemon Go Top of charts

Nostalgic

In my conversations with the millennials (both in their twenties) playing the Pokémon Go, as children they were avid players of Pokémon on the Nintendo DS.  10 years later, they admitted that part of the allure was that it was nostalgic and brought back happy memories.

Innovative Game Play

The one unique thing about this game is that it requires the players to go outside and search for the Pokémon characters.    Essentially, it’s a virtual scavenger hunt.  The game’s augment reality is an interesting aspect.  However, I talked to one player who found it annoying and actually turns it off which makes me think it’s not a driving feature of the game.

Social

Once a player gets to level 5 in the game, they can join teams.  Many games have a social aspect to it.  However, what’s different about Pokémon Go is that because it forces players to walk out in the real word to find the characters, the social aspect can be real (not virtual).  The millennial that I spoke to, said that all her friends at Taco Bell are on the same team and they would often go on their scavenger hunt after work.

A Brilliant Monetization Strategy

As I mentioned earlier, Pokémon Go is currently the Top Grossing App on the Apple Store.  As in most free games, there’s an in-app purchase where players can buy virtual goods which is typical (from my conversation my Pokémon Go playing millennials between the two of them had already spent $25).  What’s brilliant is virtual good called “Lure” Module which attracts a Pokémon to a PokeStop for 30 minutes.

A New York pizzeria claims that their revenue jumped 75% over the weekend by purchasing $10 in Lure Modules.   So if you buy in bulk it comes out to $1.70 per Lure Module which is a pretty good ROI.  Even more interesting is that there will be a national sponsorship system where retailers like Jamba Juice  and McDonalds can set up their own  Poke Stops.

Pokemon Go Lure

The  Future

Time will tell if Pokémon Go has staying power or if it’s just a fad. Right now, it’s going very strong.  Success spawns imitators and I wouldn’t be surprised if we see a Disney or Looney Tunes version next year.    Maybe Pokémon Go’s model will inspire your own startup.

By Rich Foreman, CEO / Apptology and Director of Startup Grind Sacramento. Rich co-authored the book Tap into the Mobile Economy and his blog has been listed in the Top 20 Mobile Marketing Blogs of 2014.  Follow Rich on Twitter at@ApptologyCEO or attend a Startup Grind Sacramento Event.

 

5 Reasons Public Sector Organizations Should Have a Native Mobile App in 2016

In a previous post, I discussed why public sector organizations and non-profits should adopt a mobile strategy and briefly mentioned that they should consider developing a native mobile app. In this article, I give five reasons why a public sector organization should develop a native mobile app.

Native Mobile App Advantage #1: Deliver Mobile Friendly Content

One of the benefits of a native mobile app is that it will deliver mobile friendly content. Any information that is displayed on the organization’s website can be repurposed and added to an app so it can be easily read on a smart phone. When adding content, it’s important to remember there’s limited real estate so you need to pick content that’s most used. Content that is rarely viewed on the web site doesn’t have to be included in the app.

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Native Mobile App Advantage #2: Convenience:

Smart Phone users spend 80% of their time using apps vs. 20% of time on the web. I think a big reason is convenience. Think about it: Would you rather use the Facebook app or launch Safari to access it? If you have content on your website that is regularly accessed, you should strongly consider developing an app to make it more convenient for your users.

Native Mobile App Advantage #3: Push Notifications

One of the most powerful features that can be found on an app is the ability to send out push notifications. Push notifications have a read rate around 80%. Compare that to email which has a dismal read rate of 22%. If you think about it, if your phone vibrates, you instinctively glance down to see if it’s an important message. That’s the power of mobile which is why apps are only going to increase in popularity.
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Native Mobile App Advantage #4: App Smartphone Capabilities

A native mobile app has the ability to leverage smartphone’s capabilities. For public sector organizations and non-profits, some of the things to consider include:

GPS: The ability to provide directions and show resources on a map

Push Notifications: Refer to Native Mobile App Advantage #3

Camera: A picture says a thousand words. The ability to send an image provides faster communication

Tap to Communicate: The ability to tap the screen for emails, calls, and text really facilitates communication

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Image Source: Fasturtle

Native Mobile App Advantage #5: Offline Mode

Probably the biggest advantage of an app over mobile web sites is the ability to work offline. A mobile web site needs an internet connection to function in comparison to an app that can function without Internet access. This is best for a population that either has unreliable data connection or for economic reasons cannot afford a Wi-Fi data plan.

A native app is a communication tool for their customers which if used and promoted properly can become a valuable asset to any public sector organization or non-profit.

 

By Rich Foreman, CEO / Apptology and Director of Startup Grind Sacramento. Rich co-authored the book Tap into the Mobile Economy and his blog has been listed in the Top 20 Mobile Marketing Blogs of 2014.  Follow Rich on Twitter at@ApptologyCEO or attend a Startup Grind Sacramento Event.

Announcements from Apple’s WWDC Keynote 2016

Image Source: Mac Rumors

On June 13th 2016, Apple’s first day of its annual WWDC Keynote Conference  was held in San Francisco, CA making some new and exciting announcements to its four pillars: watchOS (Apple Watch), tvOS (Apple TV), OS X (macOS), and iOS (iPhone/iPads). The event will continue until the 17th of June. Most of these items and updates will launch during Fall of this year.

watchOS 3 Updates

-Upgraded app downloads for optimized performance

-Dock interface that allows users to easily manage multiple apps that are open

-New and improved faces for watch

-Face exchange allowing users to cycle between watch faces based on preference

-New “Scribble” function allowing easy fingertip swiping

-Advanced support for wheelchair users

Image Source: Gadgets Global

tvOS Updates

-“Single Sign in” eliminates having to manually login to each AppleTV app

-“Dark Mode” for night owls or those that prefer a dim looking screen

-Automatically downloads associated AppleTV app after downloading iPhone video app

-Advanced “Siri Voice” search capabilities

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iPhone Updates

-iPhone now has remote control capabilities

-Emulates touchpad letting users to easily manage AppleTV’s Interface

-Utilize iPhone’s keyboard on AppleTV

-Gyroscope now can be used as a game controller

-Advanced lock screen and 3D touch support; “deep press” for more app details and simply move body away from phone to lock

-Automatic voicemail transcriptions

iPhone Updates

-New “Swift Playgrounds” allows users to get their feet wet in coding by offering how-tos, tutorials, and user-friendly lectures for the building blocks of app development

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OS X Updates

-Rebranding OS X to simply macOS  (first name change in over a decade)

-Upcoming OS will be called macOS Sierra

-Auto-unlocking capabilities; Sierra can detect when you’re next to it by identifying your iPhone or watchOS

-copy and paste between any device; copy something from iPhone and paste into Sierra

-Advanced storage space reduction capabilities; removes temp files, old mail, etc. while auto-downloading when needed

Apple Pay integration allowing complete secure and anonymous transactions with fingerprint authentication

Picture in Picture (PIP) allowing seamless window management; watch YouTube while working without taking up space on screen

-Advanced “Siri Voice” capabilities; from generic to complex queries

-Debut of iOS 10; Craig Federighi said it will be “the biggest iOS release for users ever”

Image Source: CultofMac

Widget Updates

-Access an app’s widgets by 3D touching its icon

Siri Voice Updates

-Integrates Siri Voice for 3rd party apps

QuickType Updates

-If someone asks via SMS, “What will the weather be like this week?” QuickType will conduct an automated search and provide an accurate response

VoIP Updates

-Skype and WhatsApp will now be integrated eliminating outdated notifications when people call

Map Updates

-Maps will now have the ability to access your schedule and whereabouts to provide accurate directions

“Extensions” enabling users to integrate 3rd party apps to easily call Uber for example

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Apple Music Updates

-Better appearance and easier navigation capabilities

HomeKit Updates

-The standard app for smart home/IoT devices now has features such as “Night Mode” that automatically locks your doors and dims the lights

iMessage Updates

-Online previews of links rather than an ugly url code

-Auto-emoji matching with text; type in “happy” and a correlating emoji will pop up

-Invisible ink; messages that will only appear when you allow via swipe

-3rd party access; allowing developers to incorporate their use into messages. For example, pay a recipient within messages via Square Cash

 

If you do decide to use “Swift Playgrounds” to develop your own mobile app, check out the 5 challenges commonly experienced by a modern appreneur to stay ahead of the curve. We don’t know about you, but we are excited for Fall to experience Apple’s new products firsthand. Check out Apple’s official website for more information and ordering process!

 

 

By Rich Foreman, CEO / Apptology and Director of Startup Grind Sacramento. Rich co-authored the book Tap into the Mobile Economy and his blog has been listed in the Top 20 Mobile Marketing Blogs of 2014.  Follow Rich on Twitter at@ApptologyCEO or attend a Startup Grind Sacramento Event.

5 Challenges of a Startup Appreneur in 2016

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The new millennium has opened up the market for mobile application development transforming entrepreneurs into appreneurs. In the last decade, we’ve seen the rise of Billion Dollar App Companies such as Uber and Airbnb. Setting sail on your very own appreneurship comes with challenges exclusive to the tech community. If you’re thinking about launching a startup or developing your very own mobile app, here are some common challenges to be aware of.

 App Development Challenge 1: The Need for Speed

A typical theme is the demand for having things not now, but yesterday. The demand for faster and more efficient solutions will only increase as time moves forward. As such, there’s an advantage to being being quick and beating your competitors to the punch.  If you streamline your product and cut down on features by focusing on developing a Minimum Viable Product, you’ll find a swifter time to market.

App Development Challenge 2: The Need for Cross platform and Backend Development

An app based startup up must realistically develop apps for both Android and iOS devices (which make up 98% of the smartphone market). In addition to developing an app, typically it needs to have a cloud-based backend to support it. It’s rare for one developer to be proficient at all so you typically need a team of developers.

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Image Source: unpauseasia

App Development Challenge 3: Focus on Design and Usability

The simple truth is that your app needs to be visually attractive.  If it ain’t people won’t download it. After they’ve downloaded it, it has to be intuitive and user friendly. If it ain’t, it won’t be used again.  Before your team starts coding, nail the user interface.

App Development Challenge 4: Nail it then Scale it.

One of the things that an apprenuers needs to do is a plan to grow their business. I’ve seen many startups fail because they didn’t have a growth plan. My suggestion is to focus on growing your concept in a certain geography. Once you figured out a successful formula, you can attack other geographies. This is how Uber, Facebook, and Airbnb grew their businesses.

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App Development Challenge 5: Cash is King

Cash is the oxygen for any business. Not enough and it dies. Typically, I see appreneurs bootstrapping (and working day jobs) while working on their MVP. Once the product goes live, it’s a race between burn rate and generating revenue and it’s game over when the cash runs out. This is where you need a CFO that will help you navigate expenses, revenue and fund raising.

 

Being an appreneur isn’t for everyone but with a lot of fortitude, courage and a good dose of luck, your startup has the potential of being the next Uber. By recognizing these challenges, build a team with the proper skills and strengths. Also if you have an app already in the works and are looking for stakeholders, check out 4 tips how to not scare away investors. Believe me, we see it happen all the time.

 

By Rich Foreman, CEO / Apptology and Director of Startup Grind Sacramento. Rich co-authored the book Tap into the Mobile Economy and his blog has been listed in the Top 20 Mobile Marketing Blogs of 2014.  Follow Rich on Twitter at@ApptologyCEO or attend a Startup Grind Sacramento Event.

Why the Public Sector Needs a Mobile Strategy in 2016

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Image Source: Open Ratio

Let’s face it; the public sector tends to drag their feet with recognizing opportunity which is why many organizations overlook the power of mobile technology. There are several reasons why non-profits and public sector organizations need to adopt a mobile strategy.

Mobile Technology is here to Stay

The main reason that a mobile strategy needs be adopted is that the population has already adopted mobile. In the few short years following the debut iPhone, these devices have had unprecedented growth. There are lots of studies and statistics to prove this point. My favorite is that there are more mobile devices than there are people in the world.

Mobile searches exceed desktop searches

Recently Google reported that there are more searches done on a mobile device than from a desktop computer. This is significant because it represents a tech trend that needs to be acknowledged and adopted. If more people are depending on mobile for their needs, it would make sense to have an effective mobile strategy.

Google’s algorithm favors mobile friendly web sites

In 2015, Google changed their algorithm that a search done on a mobile device will favor mobile friendly websites. Based on points 2 and 3, organizations that have a mobile friendly web site will have an advantage over those that don’t.

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Image Source: Deluxe E-Vectors

Mobile may be the only means of internet access

In a recent study, mobile was the only means of access to the Internet for 23% of families below the poverty level. So for organizations that deal with providing social services, a significant part of the population they serve can only access the internet via mobile device.

Web sites designed for desktops are difficult to navigate from mobile phone

A good example is the California WIC web site. This web site is hard enough to navigate on a desktop computer. If you are in the WIC program, there’s a slight chance that the only internet connection you have is through a mobile device. Try navigating the WIC web site with your smart phone and experience what it looks like to have a poor mobile strategy.

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Image Source: Mobloggy

When developing a mobile strategy, there are 3 elements to consider:

Develop a mobile friendly website

This will address points 2 and 3 previously discussed.

Communicate via SMS

I see a lot of communication from the Public Sector done via email marketing. Sadly, with an open rate of only 22%, it’s really a futile way to communicate. SMS, on the other hand, has a read rate of 98%. The good news is that there are a lot of SMS marketing tools out there that are relatively inexpensive. I’ve actually seen a couple of organizations that realize that SMS is a better way to communicate and employees end up using their personal mobile devices to send out text messages.

Develop a mobile app

An app can be a very effective tool to communicate with the population served by a public sector organization. A mobile app that is used specifically for a platform or device is what’s called a “native app.” The reasons an organization should have their own native app are numerous and as such, I plan to write a future post on why a public sector organization would need a native app.

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Businesses will continually develop more simplified mobile solutions to increase work efficiency and communication. One way or another, this is the direction the future holds. I want you to take advantage of this trend by staying ahead of the curve and strategize how to most effectively integrate mobile. If you manage a public sector organization, I hope this post gave you some food for thought on why you need to adopt a mobile strategy and how to go about it. If you want to read on some of the common challenges in the mobile community, check out my personal insight as a modern day appreneur. 

By Rich Foreman, CEO / Apptology and Director of Startup Grind Sacramento. Rich co-authored the book Tap into the Mobile Economy and his blog has been listed in the Top 20 Mobile Marketing Blogs of 2014.  Follow Rich on Twitter at@ApptologyCEO or attend a Startup Grind Sacramento Event. 

Highlights of Apple’s March 2016 Announcement

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If you missed Apple’s Product announcement, you can view it here.  For your convenience here are the highlights:

Overall it was a “ho hum” product announcement. If you want to check out the latest news on Apple products and future plans for the platform, read the announcements from their annual 2016 WWDC Keynote Event .

 

By Rich Foreman, CEO / Apptology and Director of Startup Grind Sacramento. Rich co-authored the book Tap into the Mobile Economy and his blog has been listed in the Top 20 Mobile Marketing Blogs of 2014.  Follow Rich on Twitter at@ApptologyCEO or attend a Startup Grind Sacramento Event.

 

 

4 Tips to Attract Mobile App Investors

If you’re thinking of starting a new business, you’re not alone. With so many new applications being developed in recent years, it seems that the young entrepreneurs are taking over. In fact, according to the Kauffman Foundation, new businesses (0-5 years old) make up almost 20% of all of the net job creation in the United States. The hardest part of a new business, though, is finding the funds to get it up and running. Here are some things to keep in mind when pitching to potential investors without scaring the living the daylights out of them.
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Mobile App Tip #1: Be original

Before an investor gets involved, he or she wants to be wowed. In short, they’re unimpressed until they’re impressed. This is clearly demonstrated by Angel Investors’ deal acceptance rate of 21%. They’re not going to shell out thousands of dollars just to produce a copycat product of something that has already been invented.
Your product needs to be fresh, it needs to be relevant, and it needs to be a sure thing. Investors are more likely to give their money to people who produce an original product than those who try to recreate the wheel.

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Image Source: Technology Pep

Mobile App Tip #2: Put it all on the table

Investors value honesty above all else, since the lack of information can come back to bite them more often than not. As of 2011, the percentage of “bad exits,” or bankruptcies were as high as 24% – so you could see how they would be a little sensitive

Make sure that from day one you are as honest about the strengths and weaknesses of your product as possible, because if you aren’t, investors will sense it and back off. The people you are pitching to didn’t get to where they are by being stupid. They most likely have a keen sense for when something isn’t right, so be respectful of that.

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Image Source: PCMA

Mobile App Tip #3: Be flexible.

Nothing turns an investor off faster than an attitude of “my way or the highway” from an entrepreneur. An investor wants to feel involved from the very beginning, and wants to feel their entrepreneur is coachable. More deals happen in the early stages of the company’s life than any other stages for a reason: The investor wants to have had enough time to see potential, but wants to get in early enough to ensure their role in its growth. You may have birthed the idea for this company, but if you want the investor on board, you’re going to have to be flexible and let them develop it.

Mobile App Tip #4: Have the Four M’s in place.

Mark Suster, a successful entrepreneur turned venture capitalist, outlined in his article The Four Main Things That Investors Look For In A Startup that an entrepreneur should demonstrate the four golden M’s: fast, upward Momentum, a stellar Management team, a large Market, and, of course, a great deal of Money or earning potential. This should all be demonstrated very early on in the first presentation.

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Image Source: MarketUmbrella

As with anything else, put yourself in the investor’s shoes and you’ll understand why and how they do the things they do. Do your research, not just on venture capitalists, but on the specific people you’re trying to meet – and you will go far. When you’re able to seal the deal, the next phase is to maintain it. You should read the 5 challenges of a startup appreneur so you can best prepare for the journey ahead.

 

Written by guest writer: Jeanine Amella